Sunday, June 10, 2012

Saturday Day Trip

Ole Boy and I took a road trip to Lawrenceburg/Ethridge, TN, to the Amish (Mennonite) Community, something we like to do each spring and summer. 
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An Amish calf...such a cute little thing.
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A common sight...children walking barefoot on gravel roads and horse drawn buggies.  The Amish do not take pictures of themselves, and I am respectful when I snap photographs.   I have never taken pictures of the very little children in the gardens, or at play, nor do I snap pictures while I am on their property.  After a little hesitation and research (and much thought), I am posting these two pictures that do not show any faces.   
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Transportation
Although the Amish will accept rides in cars, and
ride on trains or buses, they do not own vehicles.
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Often, you will see cars and trucks parked in the driveways, but they are owned by people wanting to buy Amish goods such as wonderful home baked breads, cakes, and cookies, or some of the best homemade peanut brittle and other candies.  They also sell fresh vegetables from their gardens.  They make bracelets, baskets, cedar furniture, jams, jellies, pickles, apple butter, pear butter, scented candles and soaps...you get the idea.

One little lady we like to visit every time we go makes the best turnovers  (fried pies, that is)! I probably shouldn't mention that I meant to take a picture before I gobbled mine down, but I forgot once I got the thing in my hand.  It was warm and scrumptious.  The peach and strawberry are the best.
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Keep in mind that these are very plain, simple people.  They do not wear bright colors (usually only blue and black), nor do they use electricity (notice no power lines). They do, however, use gas for some equipment, such as milking machines (though  I believe some milking is still done by hand).  They often use a gasoline engine to pump water from a well.  They also sometimes use gas to cook, like the lady who makes the fried pies. 
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The wives pluck, cut, and fry their own chickens.  They bake, wash and clean.  The women and small children tend the gardens, and the men and young boys toil in the fields.   It is very humbling to watch the hard work that goes into their "simple" life.  After marriage, men do not cut their beards; however, they do not keep mustaches, as they believe mustaches are associated with the military, and they strive to be peaceful and live in harmony.
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They are German in their heritage, and Christian in their beliefs.  They believe, as do I, that the Bible is the inspired word of God; that Jesus is the son of God, who died for our sins.  They are committed to peace, and they believe their faith calls for a lifestyle of discipleship, service and holy living, hence the "not being conformed to the world." way of life. (Roman 12:2)
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Again, notice no power lines.   Young boys mow grass by the
use of a push reel mower, not a gasoline powered machine. 
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All homes have gardens.   The most precious little children work in these gardens in their bonnets and hats, and their pilgrim-like clothing.  They are friendly little ones, and also very smart and responsible, often helping out with the taking of money and counting back change;  very young children doing a very good job...without a register or a calculator.
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Hand made signs dot the community and line the fences. 
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If you're ever in the Lawrenceburg area, you should make your way to Ethridge, and drive along the gravel roads in the Amish community.  Even if you don't buy any of their goods (though you should definitely get a loaf of their homemade bread, just once in your life, and eat it while it's still warm), I believe you'd be touched by this very different way of life.   It's a lifestyle that not a lot of us could manage very well...or at least not without some complaint.  

6 comments:

  1. That would be fascinating, interesting to see! What a simple way of life (I wouldn't last long in it, LOL, I like my "creature comforts"). What a nice place to spend a day too!! I like the barns you took pictures of; there's a meme out there (I think it runs on Tuesdays) that features barns. Let me know if you are interested in it and I'll try to find the link if you want to participate.

    sounds like a great weekend??

    betty

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  2. Sweet...the little calf even looks Amish....too sweet! Love their farms although I would think I am to "tender" for their lifestyle...though somewhere inside of me I think I would be AWESOME AMISH...cept for the belief portion...I do not quite believe as they do...but the concept of being self-reliant I think is incredible....but as That Corgi...I want comfort of running water, < toilets and showers and washing machings / dryers > ... and A/C and and and ....I think the part I like the most is the cooking ....and farming - gardening...etc...thanks I truly enjoyed your blog today....love the Amish ..thanks for the pics

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  3. In 1987 I visited some friends that lived in Gonzales, Texas (outside San Antonio) and there's a fairly large group of Amish living in the Gonzales area. We went by one house that was up on stilts and they kept there horses & other livestock under the cover of the house. Even on a hot day you would see smoke rising from chimneys so we thought perhaps the woman were cooking on wood stoves. They too had road side stands where they sold craft items, jams, jellies, etc. The funniest thing I saw on that visit was the day we pulled up to a Dairy Queen and there was a horse & buggy in the parking lot. We went in & there were two Amish men enjoying banana splits (while their wives were probably home heating big tubs of water to do the family's laundry) Beautiful pictures and interesting narrative my friend!!

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  4. I'd love to see a reality show like "Jersey Shore wives tackle real values on an Amish farm."

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  5. Hello! I'm here visiting from Chatty Crone's blog. I enjoyed seeing the pictures of Amish in your area. We have a bit of Amish here in my part of Ohio...even more North of here...and where I'm from in Western Ky was starting to build up a good sized population when we left 7 years ago. The only thing about them is I wish they would not tie their lifestyle so closely to their religion and if the kids don't choose to do it that way that they would not be shunned. I feel so bad for them and the Amish are big on forgiving as for example the Nickle Mines shootings but they can't forgive their own kids...it is so sad. But their food is very good...we have a restaurant with a buffet that is to die for!
    Looking forward to getting to know ya!

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